Here’s episode #57 of our SoKing News Podcast Weekly Recap, which is sponsored by a generous grant from J-Lab’s Encore Media Entrepreneurs program, supported with funding from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, and the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation:

SoKing News Weekly Recap for June 24-27, 2016: Gunshot puts local campus into ‘Shelter-in-Place’ mode; new Police Chief for Normandy Park; Highline School Bond coming to Nov. ballot?; Puget Sound Weather Geek forecast; Jack Mayne on Sound Transit; ‘The Final Take’ & more…

Please share this Podcast – just press the Menu button above and elect ‘Share’! You can also subscribe, hear previous episodes and rate us on iTunes here!

By Jack Mayne

There will be a new Highline School District bond issue on the November ballot if the school board approves a proposal from the Capital Facilities Advisory Committee.

The amount of the new bond is projected at $299 million. Previous bonds that did not pass were $376.0 million (2014) and $385 million (2013). This new measure will be officially decided at a Highline School Board meeting on July 20.

Why November?
In a news release on Thursday (June 23) the district said the general election in November was chosen because the presidential election should bring higher than average voter turnout, “so the vote will more accurately reflect the community’s desires.”

The district said sharing the ballot with other measures and candidate decisions would reduce the cost of the election the district will be assessed by King County Elections.

Another reason to go to voters this year is that construction costs are rising, so “the sooner construction begins the less expensive it will be.”

What would be done?
The district says the proposed school bond “prioritizes facilities in the worst condition and adds classrooms to address overcrowding and make room for class size reduction. It also includes dollars for initial design work on future new high schools at Evergreen and Tyee campuses.”

The money would also pay for security improvements at all schools.

But a major issue is to rebuild Highline High School, preserving as much of the façade as structurally and financially feasible.

The money would permit building a “new school on the district-owned Zenith site to house Des Moines students, with room for growing enrollment” and to build a new middle school on the district-owned Glacier site.

The bond issue would also replenish the capital fund, ‘which will be depleted in 2017-18” which “covers critical needs and emergency repairs.”

Making “required improvements to Olympic” so it can be used to house students during Highline High School construction and future school construction projects.

The Capital Advisory Committee plan is in three phases of improvements over 15 to 18 years.

“Each phase would require a voter-approved bond to fund construction,” said the district news release.

The committee was comprised of Highline residents, staff, and students who spent the past year “intensely studying the question of how to address the need for new or renovated schools.”

The Highline School Board signaled its agreement with the committee’s recommendations at a Wednesday (June 22) meeting when it introduced a resolution to put a bond measure on the November ballot, which “recognizes the many hours of study and discussion by the Capital Facilities Advisory Committee.

The group consists of “39 community members who met for 10 months to craft a long-range facilities plan and bond proposal.”

“On behalf of the entire board, I want to thank the committee members for their months of meetings and examining the needs of our schools. The result of their work is a bond package that truly reflects the will of the community,” said School Board President Michael Spear.

The last attempt to pass a bond issue was a February 2015 special election, which was approved by a simple majority of 57 percent – but it failed because it did not meet the required 60 percent of the vote.

BHHSOpenHouse958866_thumbSTB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Northwest’s Open House – set for this SUNDAY, June 26 – is an immaculate, 2-bedroom dollhouse with tons of great features!

The owner has left no room untouched – granite counters, stainless Samsung appliances, tile floors, farmer’s sink and skylights in the kitchen, remodeled bath with pedestal sink and dining area converted to office space.

Other features include a bay window, recessed lighting, cozy fireplace, wood wrapped windows, 200 amp service and pvc plumbing.

Outside is a deck with a sun room and a detached garage with a finished interior. It’s nice!

Here are some pics (click images to see larger versions):

957122

957122-01

957122-02

957122-03

957122-04

957122-05

957122-06

957122-07

957122-08

957122-09

957122-10

957122-11

957122-16

957122-13

957122-14

957122-15

957122-12

Here are the details:

WHAT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Open House.

WHEN: This SUNDAY, June 26, from Noon – 2 p.m.

WHERE: 13741 34th Ave S., Tukwila 98168 (MAP)

INFO:

  • List Price: $269,900
  • MLS Number: 957122
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Bathrooms: 1
  • Year Built: 1944
  • Approximate House SqFt: 790
  • Lot Square Footage: 7,459

Site Features:

  • Dbl Pane/Storm Windw
  • Dining Room
  • Skylights
  • Cabana/Gazebo
  • Cable TV
  • Deck
  • Fenced-Fully

Marketing Remarks:

Come and see this immaculate dollhouse.

The owner has left no room untouched – here’s the list: granite counters, stainless Samsung appliances, tile floors, farmer’s sink and skylights in the kitchen, remodeled bath with pedestal sink and dining area converted to office space.

Other features include a bay window, recessed lighting, cozy fireplace, wood wrapped windows, 200 amp service and pvc plumbing.

Outside is a deck with a sun room and a detached garage with a finished interior.

It’s nice!

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses, and click here to “Like” them on Facebook.

Welcome new Advertiser Sit N’Stay Pet Sitting, LLC, owned and operated by Burien resident Brittany Shea!

Relocation to our area five years ago meant leaving her established pet sitting business back in Texas. Now she’s ready to get back to what she loves best – getting to know your furry family members and delivering high quality and reliable care for their individual needs.

Whether it’s special dietary or medication needs, or just your pet’s unique personality, Brittany can handle it with aplomb.

She offers a variety of services, just check out her website here – AND right now she is offering an introductory 20% off your first booking!

Learn a little more about Brittany here in her own words:

bde01a_f3564aec77044c45bb4db80784b0e6db~mv2_d_3038_3352_s_4_2-2Hi! My name is Brittany and I’m the owner/operator of Sit N’ Stay Pet Sitting L.L.C. I’ve always had an innate connection and compassion for animals since I was very young. A Texas native, I grew up on a farm and wanted a career that would allow me to incorporate my true passion of caring for animals into my life. What could be better way to spend my days?

As a former Veterinary Technician, I know how to provide healthcare for animals on a casual or emergent basis. I pride myself on utilizing the most natural means available in caring for all fur kids so they live a long, healthy life. So you can rest assured that your pet is in capable, compassionate hands while in my care.

I have four wonderful dogs who keep my boyfriend and I on our toes! They truly believe they are people and we humor them as much as we can!

I love every breed and what their varying personalities have to offer. It’s important to know of anything that helps your dog be the best they can be and it’s also good to touch on any triggers or special needs your fur kid might need. It’s all about keeping everyone safe, happy and healthy!

I can provide daily dog walks, care for your animals in your home while you’re away, acute care for pets recovering from illness or injury,basic training and group outings. I’m happy to stick to your pets regular routine so they can feel comfortable.

I look forward to meeting you and caring for your four-legged children soon!

Vacation time is here! Call today to schedule top quality care for your pet:

Sit ‘N Stay Pet Sitting, LLC
Serving Burien, Normandy Park, Des Moines, Kent, S. Seattle, and SeaTac

Phone: 206.370.0169

Website: http://www.wesittheystay.com

MayorsLuncheon16-Siefkes

Story, Photo & Audio by Scott Schaefer

The Seattle Southside Chamber of Commerce hosted its annual Mayor’s Luncheon on Thursday, June 18, with representatives from SeaTac, Burien, Des Moines, Normandy Park, and Tukwila speaking.

Held at the new Four Points by Sheridan Hotel in Des Moines, each spoke about their city’s status, new projects and visions for the future.

Representing SeaTac was Mayor Michael Siefkes – click the ‘Play’ button to hear his raw audio:

Here’s episode #56 of our SoKing News Podcast Weekly Recap, which is sponsored by a generous grant from J-Lab’s Encore Media Entrepreneurs program, supported with funding from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, and the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation:

SoKing News Weekly Recap for June 17-20, 2016: Inquest opened into police shooting of Burien man; fundraiser for crash victims raises ~$10,000; local beaches closed to shellfish harvesting; special guest does Puget Sound Weather Geek forecast; ‘The Final Take’ & more…

To share this Podcast, press the Menu button above and elect ‘Share’; you can also subscribe, hear previous episodes and rate us on iTunes here!

HSDCFACCommittee16-500

Thirty-nine Highline parents, students, and community members spent the last 10 months studying and deliberating about the need to improve or replace schools in Highline, and this week they recommended a bond to fund new school construction.

Co-chairs Rose Clark, a former Burien city council member, and Danielle Houle, a SeaTac resident, presented the group’s recommendations to the school board on Wednesday evening, June 15. Many members of the Capital Facilities Advisory Committee (CFAC) attended the board work session.

CFAC’s plan lays out three phases of improvements over 15-18 years. Each phase would require a voter-approved bond to fund construction.

The committee identified four top-priority problems to be solved in Phase 1:

  • Elementary capacity – With growing enrollment and state funding for smaller class sizes, more elementary classrooms are needed.
  • Middle school capacity – Current middle schools do not have room to accommodate growing enrollment and the addition of sixth grade.
  • Des Moines Elementary – This 90-year-old school is ranked as the Highline school in worst condition in an independent survey by architects.
  • Highline High School – HHS is ranked in second worst condition in the same survey.

CFAC recommends the following projects in Phase 1:

  • Security improvements at all schools in the district.
  • Rebuild Highline High School, preserving as much of the façade as structurally and financially feasible.
  • Begin design of new Evergreen and Tyee campuses.
  • Build new school on the district-owned Zenith site to house Des Moines students, with room for growing enrollment.
  • Build a new middle school on the district-owned Glacier site.
  • Replenish the capital fund, which will be depleted in 2017-18. This fund covers critical needs and emergency repairs.
  • Make required improvements to Olympic so it can be used to house students during HHS construction and future school construction projects.

The recommendations are the result of a year-long process that included analyzing enrollment projections, reviewing building conditions and financial data, and touring aging schools.

“This was a community-driven process,” said Co-Chair Houle. “District staff provided the information we asked for, and the community members based their decisions on data.”

The CFAC co-chairs praised committee members for dedicating many hours to understanding the issues and developing solutions.

“I been involved in many committees over my long years working for this community, and this is the best one I have ever experienced,” said Co-chair Clark. “The process we followed should be a model for problem-solving in the future.”

The school board is reviewing the CFAC recommendations and will make the final decision on whether and when to place a bond on the ballot.

The committee is composed of 40 members.

Appointed Members:

  • Maria Santiago – Highline Council PTSA Representative
  • Vanissa Guiberson – Highline Special Needs PTA Representative
  • Chuck Tuman – Highline Citizens for Schools Representative
  • Sue McCabe – Highline Education Association (HEA) Representative
  • Kyle Linman – Principal’s Association Representative
  • Dale Nuce – Teamsters Representative
  • Sophie Rock – Student Representative – Mount Rainier High School
  • Jose Bermudez – Student Representative – Highline High School
  • Keller Galo-Mejia – Student Representative -Tyee Campus
  • Larissa Merlo-Huerto – Student Representative – Evergreen Campus
  • Susan West – City of Normandy Park Representative
  • Jeff Robinson – City of SeaTac Representative
  • Michelle Wills – City of Des Moines Representative
  • Dan Trimble – City of Burien Representative
  • Lois Schipper – King County Council Representative

At-Large Members (selected by lottery):

  • Laura Castronover
  • Rose Clark
  • Joseph Clegg
  • Linda Cook
  • Barbara Daligcon
  • Jim Daligcon
  • Aaron Easter
  • Aaron Garcia
  • Michel Hansmire
  • Chad Harper
  • Jennifer Hefford-Anderson
  • Danielle Houle
  • Andrea Ivy
  • Nicole Jolley
  • Elizabeth Leavitt
  • Joey Martinez
  • Karla Ohrt
  • Jen Pilgrim
  • David Polda
  • Kathy Reed
  • Susan Rombauer
  • Nora Vivarelli
  • Tony Vo
  • Tonita Webb

In addition to forty community members, district staff members will also be in attendance of the meetings. They will be supported by other educational and operational staff, professional consultants, and other experts as appropriate to provide a comprehensive understanding of the District’s current fiscal, physical and educational conditions.

Staff Members:  

  • Dr. Susan Enfield – Superintendent
  • Duggan Harman – Chief of Staff & Finance
  • Scott Logan – Chief Operations Officer
  • Catherine Carbone Rogers – Chief Communications Officer
  • Scott Hodgins – Executive Director of Capital Projects

Here’s a video overview of the committee:

Review CFAC’s presentation and listen to a complete audio recording of the June 14 presentation by visiting the CFAC web section (highlineschools.org/CFAC).

SITP_Flier2016

SeaTac’s Parks & Recreation Department announced that it will be bringing residents another great summer of music performances with its FREE ‘Music in the Park’ summer concert series, which starts Friday, June 24.

“Bring a blanket or lawn chair and family and friends to enjoy live music,” reads an announcement.

Performances are free and additional parking is available at the Alaska Airlines parking lot.

Concerts are held at Angle Lake Park from 6:30 – 8 p.m., and are sponsored by the City of SeaTac and supported by 4Culture.

Here’s the lineup for the Friday night series at Angle Lake Park:

  • Friday, June 24: Show Nuff Funk (Hard core, old school, funk band)
  • Friday, July 8: Cory Wilds Band (Energetic three piece unit that blends elements of traditional Rock, Blues and Jazz.)
  • Friday, July 15: Kim Archer (Vocally-driven soulful rock, original songs and vintage hits.)
  • Friday, July 29: Ventura Highway Revisited (Acoustic based rock of the 70′s.)

Music in the Park at North SeaTac Park (Co-sponsored with City of Burien)

The following performances are organized by the City of Burien with support from the City of SeaTac.

Concerts are held in North SeaTac Park near S. 128th Street & 20th Avenue S. from 6:30 – 8 p.m.

  • Wednesday, July 13: Highline Symphonic Band (Symphonic music)
  • Wednesday, July 20: 14/48 Theatre (Family Theatre)
  • Wednesday, July 27: Supersones (Cuban Salsa)
  • Wednesday, August 3: Little Sara & the Night Owls (Classic Soul/Blues)

BHHSOpenHouse958866_thumbSTB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Northwest’s Open House – set for both this Saturday and Sunday – is a 3-bedroom Rambler in the Manhattan neighborhood of Burien.

This home would make an excellent Father’s Day gift as well, since it comes with Lot A Beach Rights to the Cove in Normandy Park!

This 1,280 square foot home features a wood burning fireplace, dining area separate from kitchen, and an additional room adjacent to utility room.

Fully fenced yard in back with patio, shed, garden area, and fruit trees on a 8,418 sq ft lot.

Bonus features include newer roof and port package.

Home has been well cared for, come see this one today!

Here are some pics (click images to see larger versions):

958866

958866-1

958866-2

958866-3

958866-5

958866-4

958866-6

958866-7

958866-8

958866-9

958866-11

958866-10

958866-12

958866-14

958866-13

958866-15

958866-15b

958866-16

Here are the details:

WHAT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Open House.

WHEN: Both Saturday, June 18, and Sunday, June 19, from 1 – 4 p.m.

WHERE: 18414 Occidental Ave S., Burien 98148 (MAP)

INFO:

  • List Price: $319,950
  • MLS Number: 958866
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathrooms: 1
  • Year Built: 1954
  • Approximate House SqFt: 1,280
  • Lot Square Footage: 8,418

Site Features:

  • Fireplace
  • Dbl Pane/Storm Windw
  • Dining Room
  • Fruit Trees
  • Garden Space
  • Terraces
  • Shed

Marketing Remarks:

Highly sought after 3 bedroom rambler in Manhattan neighborhood of Burien with Lot A Beach Rights to the Cove in Normandy Park.

This 1,280 sq ft home features a wood burning fireplace, dining area separate from kitchen, and an additional room adjacent to utility room.

Fully fenced yard in back with patio, shed, garden area, and fruit trees on a 8,418 sq ft lot.

Bonus features include newer roof and port package.

Home has been well cared for, come see this one today!

Click here to see the full, detailed listing, or take a virtual tour here.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses, and click here to “Like” them on Facebook.

By Jack Mayne

While considering a development plan for the Angle Lake area, the SeaTac City Council heard that a commercial “park and fly” building may be allowed, although such facilities are banned at the 154th Street Sound Transit light rail station.

City Councilmember Tony Anderson gave notice that he planned to submit modifications to the Angle Lake legislation that would ban such lots, inside a building or on surface lots.

The Council also heard about plans the Port of Seattle has to cut down and replace tall trees that could impede the landing and take off area for the airport.

City to reconsider parking
During the SeaTac City Council study session Tuesday (June 14), the Council heard a first presentation of an ordinance that would adopt the Angle Lake Station Area development regulations by Senior Planner Anita Woodmass and Planning Manager Steve Pilcher.

“Park and fly” parking facilities, those used by people leaving the city on flights for various amounts of time, came up when Councilmember Erin Sitterley asked if such facilities were prohibited in the Angle Lake development.

General parking, said Woodmass, allows for general parking structures, but are limited in places, and developers are allowed an excess of 10 percent of the number of stalls.

So-called “park and fly” facilities are permitted in a structure without limit in the SeaTac central business area and in the Angle Lake area, Woodmass said.

Sitterley noted that is not consistent and Woodmass agreed, saying the city center has a parking limit of 300 spaces, a limit also that applies to the 154th Street Sound Transit station.

But, no “park and fly” facilities of any kind are allowed at the 154th Street transit station, but are at the Angle Lake station although only in a building.

There are no limits to parking facilities elsewhere in the city, whether on the surface or in structures.

Anderson wants ban
Councilmember Tony Anderson said the Port of Seattle maintains it can ignore the city’s parking restrictions in relation to its property which Anderson said could permit the Port to build a giant parking facility, spurring a private developer to build a similar one in SeaTac.

He said putting hundreds of cars onto 200th Street area in south SeaTac from the freeway to the Angle Lake development could be a serious problem that should be considered by the city.

Acting City Manager Joe Scorcio told the Council it has ordered a complete review of “park and fly” facility problems, and could wait for the new study to be done before making more decisions on parking at Angle Lake.

“This whole business of how we regulate parking in the city is a ripe for conversation – you have already directed us to pursue,” said Scorcio.

Anderson said that if the city does not allow “park and fly” lots at the 154th Sound Transit station, “why should be allow it at Angle Lake?”

He said that he intended to propose extending prohibitions of “park and ride” facilities to Angle Lake, as it is now at the 154th Street station, when final approval of the ordinance comes before the Council.

He said the Angle Lake area along International Boulevard could become a developable area for the citizens of SeaTac, not just a place for a facility primarily benefits the Port of Seattle’s airport.

Scorcio said the staff would have such a potential ordinance ready for Council consideration at the June 28 meeting.

Trees vs. airplanes
Port of Seattle Community Engagement Manager Marco Milanese and Environmental Program Manager Steve Rybolt told the Council about its Flight Corridor Safety Programs, which are plans to spend $9 million to clear overly tall trees, and anything else, from the landing and takeoff areas of planes landing at Sea-Tac.

The main problem are 2,800 trees in and around the airport, said Milanese, either those already too tall and others that soon will be within SeaTac and other cities, or on Highline School District and other publicly owned property in the flight paths of planes.

Most of the potential or present obstructive trees – 2,600 – about 2,400 of which are on residential property at present or future highway lands, and inside the city limits, he said, with 30 residences and five commercial properties. Those trees will need to be removed, said Milanese.

In many cases, the Port will hire subcontractors to replant some trees with smaller ones often on a one-for-one basis, added Rybolt. The new trees will be of types that will not grow to become future problems that would have to be cut down in a few years.

First to be taken down are trees on Port land, then on commercial property. In 2018 the trees on residential properties will be taken down, he said.

Anderson asked if the Port was going to compensate private property owners for cutting down their trees and Milanese said they Port has not figured that out.

Fernald said that some trees on residential properties are noise buffers against the airplane noises so the Port needs to be mindful of that issue and work with private property owners to be sure they aren’t subjected to more airplane noise if buffer trees are removed.